April Event in a Box: We Care

april eib photoSexual Assault is unfortunately prevalent in today’s culture. The National Institute of Justice reports that three percent of all college-age women are victims of completed or attempted rape, which translates to about 300 women on a campus of 10,000 female students. And nearly 80 percent of female victims of completed rape experienced the crime before the age of 25.

If sexual assault is as common as these statistics point out, how can we not talk about abortion in cases of rape?  It is estimated that pregnancy occurs in five percent of rapes. These women are then faced with the heart wrenching choice of parenting their child or having an abortion.

Pro-lifers, especially those in the public eye, need to know how to answer the “what about rape?” question. The fear of being perceived as not compassionate and hateful is at the forefront of the minds of many good, pro-life candidates who have no idea how to answer that question when it comes to abortion. Admittedly, it’s a tough one.

By refusing to answer the question or giving a cringe-worthy response, the credibility of the pro-life movement is put in jeopardy because we leave doubts in the minds of so many Americans who have mixed emotions on the question, believing abortion is wrong but not wanting to further hurt a rape survivor.

However, it’s a question that must be answered because so much is at stake: the health and well-being of the mother and the life of the baby, who through no fault of his or her own now exists. While crisis pregnancies in cases of rape are indeed a very tiny percentage of all abortions committed, they still involve the taking of a life and a lifetime of complications, mentally and possibly physically, for rape survivors.

We want you to have the very real and honest conversations that need to be had.

The conversations will be hard, especially given the violent and personal nature of rape and sexual assault. The pro-life movement absolutely has to be compassionate and understanding of what these women have been through and continue to suffer. But abortion is not the answer to lessening that suffering.

While the intention may be to ease her suffering, abortion, even in the case of rape, is a great injustice to the second victim, the baby, because he or she did not choose to be placed in this situation, either. Ultimately, we will ask the question: If both victims of this tragic situation can walk away with their lives intact, isn’t that the best option?

The Elliot Institute surveyed 192 women who conceived during a rape or incest. Of those victims, 70 percent carried the baby to term and either raised the child or made an adoption plan, 29 percent had an abortion, and 1.5 percent had a miscarriage.

  • 43 percent of these women said they felt pressured to abort from family or health workers.
  • 78 percent of those who aborted had regrets and said that abortion was the wrong solution.
  • None of the women who gave birth said they regretted their decision.

Talking about the “what about rape?” question demands generous compassion and empathy. Sexual assault is an incredibly violent crime that no one should ever have to face. The damage done to the victims are extensive – mentally, emotionally, physically, spiritually – but adding an abortion to that crime is adding another, equally innocent, victim. The pro-life movement needs to find a way to deliver that message with care and love.

What’s in the Box:

  • “What if it’s not my fault” postcards
  • “What is Consent” Cards
  • “We Care” Flyers
  • Sexual Assault Hotline Information
  • Sexual Assault and Abortion Talking Points

How to you the Box:

With the sensitive nature of this event, every group members needs to be present for a training with your Regional Coordinator on how to approach the issue. Ask your Regional Coordinator for the “We Care” training near the time of your event. Reach out to women’s groups or sexual assault awareness groups on campus and ask to co-host an event on campus about sexual assault. You can host a pro-life speaker who has had an experience with rape, has conceived in rape, or was conceived in rape. Make sure that all of your interactions with students are compassionate and loving.

Additional Resources:
Before you host your event, make sure you request a We Care Training with your Regional Coordinator. If you would like additional post cards, ask your Regional Coordinator for more!

  • If you are a student in CA or NV, please contact Emily Wilkinson.
  • If you are a student in OR, WA, ID, MT, HI, AK, ND, or SD, please contact Lisa Atkins.
  • If you are a student in CO, NM, WY, UT, or AZ, please contact Lo Castillo.
  • If you are a student in MI, IN, or OH, please contact R.J. McVeigh.
  • If you are a student in VA, MD, DC, PA, or DE, please contact Michele Hendrickson.
  • If you are a student in KY, TN, or WV, please contact Brenna Hartwell
  • If you are a student in VT, CT, NH, MA, RI or ME, please contact Jane Riccardi.
  • If you are a student in NE, KS, IL, MO, or IA, please contact Reagan Nielsen.
  • If you are a student in OK or TX, please contact Katie Martin.
  • If you are a student in NY or NJ, please contact Keri Landeche.
  • If you are a student in GA, FL, SC, or NC, please contact Ryan Eyrich.
  • If you are a student in WI or MN, please contact Maddie Schulte.
  • If you are a student in AL, MS, LA, AR, or PR, please contact David Hesketh.

If you are a high school student, click here.
**SFLA Resources are only available to active high school or college student groups. If you are a youth minister or community member, please email info@studentsforlife.org for other options.

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